Why You Can't Stop Waking Up in the Middle of the Night

It's time to get your much needed snooze.

September 6, 2017
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If you're constantly waking up in the middle of the night, it's safe to say, you're not getting your much need seven to eight hours. Fortunately, Helix's co-founder and sleep expert, Adam Tishman is here to help you get the snooze you deserve. It's time to find out why you're constantly waking up in the middle of the night and correct your sleep mistakes.

More: 4 Sleep Supplements That Actually Work

Say goodbye to restless nights and hello to deep and rejuvenating sleep.

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You have undiagnosed sleep apnea

"Sleep apnea is a treatable condition in which breathing actually stops and starts throughout the night causing you to wake up, disrupting your sleep repeatedly," says Tishman. "The cause can be all kinds of things from enlarged tonsils or obesity, but in most cases, you won't realize you even have it until a bed partner notices your breathing periodically pauses throughout the night."

More: 7 Steps to Restful, Rejuvenating Sleep

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Indigestion

"We’ve all been there," Tishman says. "Indigestion can wake you up in the middle of the night, especially if you ate a large meal close to bedtime or had a big glass of red wine. Try to stop eating, or opt for something lighter, a few hours before falling asleep to avoid this. And forget the midnight snacks, too."

More: 6 Slimming Sleep Secrets

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Stress

"Stress can disrupt all aspects of your life, especially sleep," says Tishman. "Falling asleep, whether it be when you first lie down, or in the middle of the night, becomes a serious challenge when your brain refuses to turn off. If you notice you're stressed out, try finding something to do before bed that calms and relaxes you to put you in the right state of mind."

More: 6 Things You Should Never Do Before Bed

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Light

"Some people have the gift of being able to fall asleep with the lights on," he says. "Some, slightly unluckier, don’t. Figure out which camp you fall into first, then make sure your room is adjusted accordingly. Light shining through your curtain or that glow from your alarm clock can wake you up if you’re sensitive."

More: 50 Tricks to Sleep Better Tonight

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Noise

"Noises from both outside and inside your bedroom can be the culprit here, especially if they’re sounds that you’re not used to," says Tishman. "If you live in the city your tolerance for shouting, sirens, and pigeons cooing on your windowsill is higher. All these sounds might disturb you if you lived in a quieter area. If you find you’re waking up to unexpected sounds, try using a white noise machine or ear plugs."

More: 5 Natural Sleep Aids

 
 
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Temperature

"Your temperature actually drops while you sleep as your whole body cools down and goes into recovery mode," he says. "Sleeping in a room that's too hot or under a blanket that's too warm makes your body work harder, which can wake you up and prevent you from getting that much needed deep sleep. Having AC when it’s hot, or a cooler mattress can really make a difference here."

More: How ‘Vitamin G’ Secretly Impacts Your Sleep

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The person sleeping next to you

"You love each other," says Tishman. "You share a bed. Doesn’t mean you share sleeping habits. Your partner rolling around flailing from a nightmare or getting up three times to use the bathroom can be major triggers for middle of the night wake-ups. Their sleep troubles become your sleep troubles. Try finding a mattress that suits you both so you start the night off comfortable."

More: How to Stop a Snorer From Snoring

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