9 Simple Ways to Boost Your Heart Health

Celebrate American Heart Month by showing your ticker some love!

January 27, 2017
woman heart health
Shutterstock

February is American Heart Month, but maintaining a healthy heart is a year-long event!

More: The 5 Best Comfort Foods for Your Heart

Celebrate by showing your ticker some TLC. Here, 9 easy ways to get started.

strawberries
Shutterstock
Nosh on strawberries and blueberries

Women who eat three or more servings of blueberries and strawberries a week, may cut their heart attack risk, according to research published in the journal Circulation

More: 8 Surprising Foods for Heart Health

woman running outdoors
Shutterstock
Whittle your waistline

Belly fat is one risk factor for heart disease, so a slimmer middle, could mean a healthier ticker. In fact, losing enough weight to reduce your waist size by 2 inches may reduce your risk of developing coronary heart disease by 10 to 15 percent, according to some researchers. (Read more about why skinny jeans are good for your heart)

ADVERTISEMENT
ADVERTISEMENT
 
whole grain pizza
Shutterstock
Eat more whole grains

Research indicates that a diet high in whole garins may reduce the risk of heart disease.

More: Sneaky Ways to Eat More Whole Grains

interval training
Shutterstock
Recharge your cardio with interval training

Alternating between high- and moderate- intensity bursts of activity can double and maybe even triple the heart benefits you’d get from a moderate sweat session. (The step-by-step guide to giving your heart a workout)

cooking with spices
Shutterstock
Cook with herbs and spices instead of salt

Too much sodium can lead to high blood pressure. Plus many herbs and spices offer heart-healthy antioxidants.

More: 5 Expert Tips for Savory Salt-Free Cooking

 
 
chocolate
Shutterstock
Enjoy chocolate

Eating the sweet stuff regularly may reduce your risk of heart disease by one-third, according to research published in the British Medical Journal.

friends laughing
Shutterstock
Laugh!

People with a sense of humor were less likely to have heart disease than those who didn't laugh as often, according to one University of Maryland study.

More: Add 11 Healthy Years to Your Life

yoga
Shutterstock
Practice yoga

Yoga has been linked to lower blood pressure and cholesterol, as well as other heart benefits.

 
 
added sugars
Shutterstock
Ditch added sugars

An increased intake of added sugar could raise blood pressure and might be associated with inflammation. Not to mention, cutting your sugar intake will also help with weight loss.

See Next