3 Stretches That Un-Slouch Your Back—All You Need Is A Doorway

Lower back pain? These gentle moves will help ease it fast.

January 6, 2017
doorway stretches
Chelsea Streifeneder

Are you sitting up straight right now? You probably are now that I reminded you. Sitting at a desk or hunching over a computer all day is horrible for your neck, back, and overall posture. If you feel tight in your chest and shoulders, do this series of stretches a few times a week to loosen up. They all use a doorway to open up the muscles we tend to close and tighten throughout the day. Try to hold each stretch for at least 30 seconds. (Looking for more ways to live a happy, healthy life? Order Prevention—and get a FREE Yoga DVD when you subscribe today.)

Lower back pain? This gentle move will help ease it fast.

Walk Out stretch
1/3 Chelsea Streifeneder
Walk out

To gauge how tight your shoulders are, hold onto a doorframe with your wrists, elbows, and shoulders in line. Keep your arms in place and slowly walk your body forward out of the doorframe. See how far you can go without straining anything, and hold.

MORE: 6 Simple Moves To Ease Sciatica

T-Press with Lunge stretch
2/3 Chelsea Streifeneder
T-Press with Lunge

Repeat the steps of the previous exercise, but this time lunge one leg out in front of you as you move forward. Make sure to keep your neck in line with your spine the whole time. The farther you lean your body out over your front leg, the more stretch you will get. Keep that back leg out long with the heel pressing into the floor for an added calf stretch. Switch legs.

MORE: 60-Second Fix For A Stiff Neck

Hanging Shoulder Stretch
3/3 Chelsea Streifeneder
Hanging Shoulder Stretch

For this one, make sure your shoulders are warmed up and loose. You will again begin holding onto the doorframe, but you can play with the height of your arms by going above your shoulders in a "Y" position, into a level "T" position, or low into an upside-down "V" position. Be careful how far you lean out in the next step because you will have to use your strength to pull yourself back up. Hold on tight as you walk out of the doorway, and then let your body lean forward until your arms are straight. Keep your core pulled in, and remember to breathe.

This story was originally published by our partners at Prevention.com.

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