Breast Milk Becoming a Popular Post-Workout Beverage (GAG!)

And you thought that protein shake was gross.

May 29, 2014
milk bottles

Yesterday The Cut reported finding men who are guzzling breast milk as the ultimate post-workout recovery drink, paying $2.50 an ounce for a mother's milk. Right. We'll let that sink in for a moment.

"I don't believe in steroids or other energy supplements," said Queens native Anthony. "I want natural stuff that's God-given, and if it's okay with moms looking to get rid of it, I'll take it."

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Granted, there are other men who say they drink breast milk for its overall health and nutrition, not just for post-workout fuel. One man in The Cut's piece says he truly believes his wife's milk has kept him super healthy for a while now.

This milky news comes in the wake of a recent study which doubted the importance of protein supplements all together as post-exercise relief and recovery. In the study, researchers discovered that there isn't really a strong connection between decreased muscle soreness or recovery when protein supplements are used before, during, or, after a single workout. On the other hand, supplements do appear to show recovery benefits when used daily in the context of an intense training routine.

More from Fitbie: 50 Protein-Packed Dinners

So is protein necessary? And if so, are these breast milk guzzlers out of their mind?

According to Los Angeles-based RD Lauren O'Connor you should most definitely nourish your body within 45 minutes of your workout. The reason why? That's when your muscles are most responsive to nutrient intake during that window of time.

"Your body needs to replete with an efficient energy source (carbs) and protein for muscle recovery," she explains. "The body uses glycogen (glucose stores) in the muscle for energy while exercising. Thus you need to refuel with carbs -- your body's preferred source of energy. Protein is also necessary for sustaining and rebuilding muscle tissue that goes through wear and tear during exercise."

Even so, beware if you're interested in this breast milk trend. The reason why? According a 2013 study, breast milk sold online on popular websites is often contaminated with high levels of bacteria, including a few instances of salmonella. Perhaps one of these protein-packed shakes is a safer alternative.

Regardless, it's important to keep in mind the reason you're refueling: To aid in muscle recover. Whether your poison is breast milk or more conventional options, keep in mind the golden rule: Don't stuff yourself silly and counteract your workout. O'Connor warns to stay away from heavy, greasy foods, no matter what kind of protein content they have. (We're lookin' at you, drive thru.)

"The last thing you want after energizing through exercise is to slow yourself down," she says. "You don't want your body to be bogged down trying to digest a fatty, large meal. It will only make you tired and less energetic. The important thing is to replete with just enough to keep your energy going and sustain your muscle integrity."

 

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